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Environmental advocate dies after setting himself on fire in NY

Environmental advocate dies after setting himself on fire in NY

A prominent American lawyer and gay rights activist has died after setting himself on fire at a NY park to protest damage being done to the planet, according to U.S. media reports.

A suicide note read that Buckel used a "fossil fuel" to commit the suicide, indicating the action was done as a type of ecological protest.

Buckel noted in his letter that he was fortunate to have "good health to the final moment", and added that he hoped his death would lead to increased action on environmental concerns.

The case attracted quite a lot of publicity and was even adapted into a movie, concentrating on Teena's life named "Boys Don't Cry", which won actress Hillary Swank an Academy Award.

The prominent lawyer also worked as a Marriage Project Director and Senior Counsel at Lambda Legal, which has long fought for LGBT rights. "Most humans on the planet now breathe air made unhealthy by fossil fuels, and many die early deaths as a result - my early death by fossil fuel reflects what we are doing to ourselves", he added in the letter he sent to the media outlets just before his death.

Camilla Taylor - Lambda Legal's director of constitutional litigation and acting legal director - said in a statement: "The news of David's death is heartbreaking".




In his suicide note, Buckel recalled the Tibetan monk protesters who have set themselves on fire in protest of the Chinese occupation in Tibet, according to the New York Daily News.

"Honourable objective in life invites honourable goal in death".

A county sheriff was found negligent in the killing for his failure to protect Teena from his rapists - who returned and killed him once he went to authorities. He also served in an official capacity on the NYC Compost Project at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, which is right next to Prospect Park.

The Brooklyn man was burned from head to toe by the time the FDNY arrived. In normally vibrant Prospect Park, where Buckel ended his life, police and firefighters gathered around what the Times calls a "grim scene".

The former lawyer's body was found by local resident Amy Hamberry who was jogging through the park. "It took us a little while to process it".

He also fought for the right of gay high-school students in Salt Lake City to organize a club, and argued against discrimination in the Boy Scoutss of America and the military.