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France says Syria's capacity to produce chemical weapons considerably weakened

France says Syria's capacity to produce chemical weapons considerably weakened

French President Emmanuel Macron said the strikes had been limited so far to Syria's chemical weapons facilities.

The Ministry of Defence (MoD) said that four RAF Tornado jets were deployed to launch missiles at a Syrian military facility.

"I believe that the action taken will have significantly degraded the Syrian regime's ability to use chemical weapons", she said.

May said intelligence and open source accounts indicated that the regime was behind the attack in Douma last Saturday.

"Important infrastructure was destroyed which will result in a setback for the Syrian regime", Mattis said.

But she will be grilled over why she broke with a convention to seek parliamentary approval for the action, a decision that she and her ministers say was driven by the need to act quickly.

The US president claimed that the joint action was meant to establish a "strong deterrent" against the production, spread, and use of chemical weapons.

A series of missile strikes were launched last night against Syria by the US, UK and France in response to the suspected chemical weapons attack in Douma a week ago.




Russia, which intervened in the war in 2015 to back Assad, has denied there was a chemical attack and has accused Britain of helping to stage the Douma incident to stoke anti-Russian hysteria.

However, May is facing questions over the legality of committing United Kingdom forces to any US -led attack on Syria.

Opposition Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn had said Britain should press for an independent United Nations -led investigation into the suspected chemical attack in Douma rather than wait for instructions from Trump on how to proceed.

"It was both right and legal to take military action together with our closest allies to alleviate further humanitarian suffering by degrading the Syrian regime's chemical weapons capability", May said.

May held an emergency cabinet meeting to discuss possible action on Thursday and there had been calls for the British parliament to be consulted before any air strikes.

May is not obliged to win parliament's approval before ordering military action, but a non-binding constitutional convention to do so has been established since a 2003 vote on joining the USA -led invasion of Iraq.

"Bombs won't save lives or bring about peace", Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the main opposition Labour Party, said in a statement.