Hi-Tech

Zuckerberg agrees to closed-door meeting with European Parliament

Zuckerberg agrees to closed-door meeting with European Parliament

But let's at least be thankful that Zuckerberg has shown us, once again, how very much privacy matters - to him personally...

Facebook (FB +0.3%) CEO Mark Zuckerberg heads overseas to meet with the European Parliament on Tuesday evening, where he'll discuss the use of personal data of the company's European Union users.

The ex-boss of Cambridge Analytica, a political consultancy that closed down after being involved in a scandal about the improper use of the data of millions of Facebook users, will appear in front of British lawmakers on June 6.

That suggests he will avoid an uncomfortable public appearance and instead meet only with the legislature's top brass behind closed doors.

It is a "snub to the United Kingdom and the millions of Facebook users in the United Kingdom who deserve answers", the tweet read.

The EU's General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which comes into effect on May 25, aims to give users more control over how their personal information is stored and used online, with big fines for firms that break the rules.




We've reached out to Facebook to ask why Zuckerberg will not take European parliamentarians questions in a public hearing. "It must be a public hearing - why not a Facebook Live?" tweeted Guy Verhofstadt, a Belgian politician who is also a Brexit negotiator on behalf of the European Parliament.

Tajani said that simply showing up to explain himself was already a good move. "It is a step in the right direction towards restoring confidence".

"Our citizens deserve a full and detailed explanation", Tajani said in a statement posted on Twitter. He had refused to appear before the committee last month, citing the ongoing investigation into the firm.

Damian Collins, the head of the United Kingdom parliament's media committee, has said he hopes Zuckerberg would take advantage of his trip to Europe next week to visit London and testify there as well.

"We hope that he will respond positively to our request, but if not the Committee will resolve to issue a formal summons for him to appear when he is next in the United Kingdom".

A DCMS committee spokesperson confirmed no formal summons has been issued to Zuckerberg to date, although Vote Leave campaign director Dominic Cummings, and former Cambridge Analytica CEO Alexander Nix - both embroiled in the burgeoning scandal over the alleged misuse of data in political campaigns - were subject to formal summons.