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Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio Report Salmonella Cases Linked to Cantaloupe

Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, and Ohio Report Salmonella Cases Linked to Cantaloupe

Consumers who have purchased pre-cut melon, including fruit salads mixed with melon, are urged not to eat it and throw it away.

The people who took ill came from IL (6), IN (11), MI (32), Missouri (10), and OH (1), the agency said.

The CDC says the outbreak is linked to pre-cut melon.

The CDC said Walmart and Kroger stores in the affected states had removed pre-cut melon linked to the outbreak from their shelves. Other recalls may be coming as the U.S. Drug and Food Administration learns more.




Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after being exposed to the bacteria. Most people are able to fully recover in 4 to 7 days. Other grocery stores could be added to the list.

People who reportedly fell ill, obtained their chicks and ducklings from several sources, including feed supply stores, websites, hatcheries and from relatives, the agency said. The CDC has indicated there have been more hospitalizations with this outbreak than what is typically seen.

Whole melons are still safe to eat, according to the CDC. The elderly, infants and people with compromised immune systems have the highest risk for serious illness. Make sure to wash the melons before you start cutting. Our Salmonella lawyers have litigated Salmonella cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of foods, such as cantaloupe, tomatoes, ground turkey, salami, sprouts, cereal, peanut butter, and food served in restaurants.