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Britain 'Ready To Ask' Russia To Extradite Suspects In Skripal Poisonings

Britain 'Ready To Ask' Russia To Extradite Suspects In Skripal Poisonings

Relations between the United Kingdom and Russian Federation are at the worst they have been since the end of the Cold War after the nerve agent attack on Sergei Skripal, a former spy, and his daughter Yulia.

The Guardian quoted a Whitehall source as saying: "The CPS has been asked to prepare extradition requests and we understand they are ready to go". Russian Federation denies any involvement in the attack.

An investigation by hundreds of British police and intelligence officers have pieced together the movements of the two Russians, from their entry into Britain through to their departure, the Guardian reported.

Recall that Sergei Skripal and his daughter Julia were found unconscious in Salisbury on March 4.

But foreign policy experts in Britain say Russian Federation will nearly certainly reject the request.

The Times notes that the request for extradition of Russians in the case of the poisoning is part of a plan for the resumption of pressure on the Kremlin in connection with the attack involving nerve agents "Beginner".




The newspaper said prosecutors had completed the extradition request and it was ready for submission.

It comes after Yahoo revealed last week that the UK Government had failed to make any contact with the Russian government or its agencies since the the murder of a British woman who was poisoned on UK soil with the deadly Novichok nerve agent more than four weeks ago. Moscow refused to extradite Russians in accordance with the Constitution.

Russian Federation retaliated by expelling an equal number of Western diplomats.

Both survived, but on June 30 a British couple were poisoned by Novichok in a nearby town, one of whom, 44-year-old mother-of-three Dawn Sturgess, subsequently died.

Her partner, Charlie Rowley, was left seriously ill from the effects of the nerve agent but was discharged from hospital.

Police have said they believe the two incidents are related, theorizing that perpetrators first smeared the Novichok on the door of Sergei Skripal's house and discarded the container, which Rowley later picked up and gave to Sturgess, who sprayed it on her wrists.