Science

Get ready for a flawless Perseid meteor show

Get ready for a flawless Perseid meteor show

Nope! Although the peaks are the best times (as long as there's no moonlight), annual meteor showers typically last weeks, not days... building up gradually and then falling off rapidly.

During the Perseids' peak on the nights of August 11-12 and August 12-13, skywatchers should see about 60 to 70 meteors per hour, Space.com said.

The Perseid meteor shower is perhaps the most beloved meteor shower of the year for the Northern Hemisphere.

The meteors will appear to come from the direction of the Perseus constellation in the north-eastern part of the sky, although they should be visible from any point.

Even if you aren't an avid astronomer, you'll still have a great view.

The phenomenon is caused by debris from the tail of the Swift-Tuttle comet entering the Earth's atmosphere and burning up, appearing as bright streaks of light crossing the sky.

The Perseid meteor shower usually dominates the sky in mid-August.




During these nights the moon will be in its crescent-shape, or "new moon" phase.

Active Junky, which is also the sister site of Space.com, has provided a list of the nation's top cities, and the best places they can go to watch the meteor show.

A glorious display of Perseid meteors is set to light up the skies over the United Kingdom on Sunday night.

You will also have a better chance of seeing the dazzling display when it is completely dark.

It's the biggest meteor shower of the year, so you better stay up late and grab your binoculars.

They should start whizzing across the sky before midnight, but the best displays will be in the hours before dawn. He added that it takes at least 30 minutes for human eyes to adjust, so be patient and that you can expect to be outdoors for a few hours. Observers in mid-northern latitudes will have the best views.

Being in the northern hemisphere, the United Kingdom is in a prime spot to witness the lunar show.