Global News

Lombok hit by another strong quake

Lombok hit by another strong quake

The quake struck as evening prayers were being said across the Muslim-majority island and there are fears that one collapsed mosque in north Lombok had been filled with worshippers.

The number forced from their homes in the disaster has soared to 270,000, national disaster agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said, with around 1,000 people severely injured. It did not have the potential to cause a tsunami, the agency added.

Local authorities, worldwide relief groups and the central government have begun organising aid, but shattered roads have slowed efforts to reach survivors in the mountainous north and east of Lombok, which bore the brunt of the quake.

A strong aftershock shook the traumatized Indonesian island of Lombok on Thursday, where tens of thousands were already homeless from an earlier quake, and sent panicked residents out of their homes and cars as buildings collapsed.

Buildings still standing on the island have been weakened after Sunday's 7.0 quake, as well as a 6.4 quake on July 29 that killed 16. Local government agencies and rescue agencies have issued different estimates, which one agency said could be as high as 381.

Rescuers search Karang Pangsor mosque after the natural disaster last weekend.

Grieving relatives were burying their dead and medics tended to people whose broken limbs hadn't yet been treated in the days since the quake. "Children were running out from the building in panic and she was stepped on by her friends", he said.




"People are always saying they need water and tarps", said Indonesian Red Cross spokesman Arifin Hadi.

He said victims can be counted several times because of the common practice of people in Indonesia using several names and noted that families of victims are entitled to financial compensation from the government when a death is confirmed.

The aftershock follows a series of quakes which have hit Indonesia over the past two weeks.

The quake was the second in a week to hit Lombok.

Indonesia is prone to earthquakes because it lies on the Ring of Fire - the line of frequent quakes and volcanic eruptions that circles virtually the entire Pacific rim. In December 2004, a massive magnitude 9.1 natural disaster off Sumatra triggered a tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen countries.

Authorities said all the tourists who wanted to be evacuated from three outlying holiday islands due to power blackouts and damage to hotels had left by boat, some 5,000 people in all.