Science

Hurricane Florence: Four reasons to fear this storm

Hurricane Florence: Four reasons to fear this storm

Since issuing a mandatory evacuation order Wednesday, nearly all of the more than 2500 residents left the island. The city's official Twitter account urged residents to move to the upper floors of their homes.

More than one million people had been ordered to evacuate the coasts of North and SC and Virginia and thousands moved to emergency shelters, officials said.

In a display of the early effects of the storm, one flood gauge on the Neuse River in New Bern, North Carolina, showed 10 feet (three meters) of flooding, the NHC said.

More than 60 people had to be pulled from a collapsing motel at the height of the storm.

Outside of the wind, the broad circulation of the storm will allow for a storm surge north of the center of circulation heading into Friday.

The center of the hurricane's eye came ashore at about 7:15 a.m. EDT (1115 GMT) near Wrightsville Beach close to Wilmington, North Carolina, with sustained winds of 90 miles per hour (150 kph), the National Hurricane Center (NHC) said. And this is just the beginning. "The larger and the slower the storm is, the greater the threat and the impact-and we have that". We have wind and rain.

THE life-threatening hurricane, Florence, is expected to hover the Carolinas in the United States with torrential rains, high winds and massive coastal erosion. The homes of about 10 million were under watches or warnings for the hurricane or tropical storm conditions.

Its storm surge and the prospect of 1 to 3 1/2 feet of rain were considered a bigger threat than its winds, which dropped off from an alarming 140 miles per hour - Category 4 - earlier in the week.




Florence has already dropped more than 30 inches of rain in some areas of the Carolina border.

Authorities main concern with Florence is extremely heavy rainfall, rather than high winds.

The entire town of Carolina Beach is just five feet above sea level, which will be no match for the expected storm surge of 13 feet or more.

Forecasters expect Florence to hit the Carolinas early in the morning on September 14. "I've lived here all my life. This may be worse than what we've seen before", Assistant Fire Chief Joey Roberts said during a press conference Wednesday.

In the video, the astronauts expressed awe at the size of the storm, while also pointing out Isaac, a former tropical storm now making its way through the Caribbean. By midnight, Amy Johnson in Belhaven, North Carolina, on the Pungo River posted a video of raging floodwaters that had inundated the first floor of her home.

Some Carolinians have expressed frustration after evacuating their homes for a storm that was later downgraded - but officials have pushed back at suggestions that Florence's threat has been exaggerated.

In Morehead City, an NWS Meteorologist captured dramatic footage of rain water sweeping through a parking lot.

The few cars out on a main street in Wilmington had to swerve to avoid fallen trees, metal debris and power lines.