Science

Insurers brace for another round of catastrophe losses from Hurricane Florence

Insurers brace for another round of catastrophe losses from Hurricane Florence

Fierce winds and massive waves are expected to lash the coasts of North and SC and Virginia even before Florence makes landfall by early Friday, bringing a storm surge as much as 13 feet (4 meters).

The storm, a Category 4 on the five-step Saffir-Simpson hurricane scale, was expected to grow stronger and larger over the next few days, the NHC said.

A tropical storm watch is in effect for north of the North Carolina/Virginia border to Cape Charles Light, VA, and for Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort.

Enough rain could fall to break North Carolina's record for a tropical storm - 24 inches - set near Wilmington during Hurricane Floyd in 1999, said Greg Carbin, chief of forecast operations at the Weather Service's national prediction center.

Early on Friday, the downtown area of the city of New Bern, on the Trent and Neuse rivers near the North Carolina coast, was underwater as emergency crews conducted several rescues, according to reports on social media.

"Wave heights to 83 ft were measured early this morning under the [northeast] quadrant of Hurricane Florence", tweeted the National Hurricane Center.

While some of the computer forecasting models conflicted, the latest projections more or less showed the storm shifting southward and westward in a way that suddenly put more of SC in danger and imperiled Georgia, too. Millions were expected to lose power from the storm and restoration could take weeks. At this time, the outer eyewall of Florence was making landfall in the the area of Wilmington, N.C.as a Category 1 hurricane.




Florence was one of two major storms on Friday.

NOAA Hurricane Hunters have been flying constantly from Lakeland Linder International Airport, right into Hurricane Florence. People getting a little more than moist over it'.

Currently, the best chances for rain and wind in our area would be Sunday afternoon or Monday, according to NWS officials.

He said the federal government and first responders are ready to assist, but that 'bad things can happen when you're talking about a storm this size'. Heavy rains were forecast to extend into the Appalachian Mountains, affecting parts of Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky and West Virginia.

Trump declared states of emergency for North and SC and Virginia, opening the way for federal aid.

Despite pleas from officials, some residents ignored calls to evacuate.

"Get out of its way, don't play games with it, it's a big one, maybe as big as they've seen, and tremendous amounts of water", Trump said in a video posted on Twitter.